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Fix Windows Update Error 0x800703e6

Here to Fix Update Error 0x800703e6 on Windows 10

0x800703e6 is yet another Windows Update error that prevents specific updates from installing. This article is dedicated to fixing this specific error.

Error 0x800703e6

What is Error 0x800703e6?

Error 0x800703e6 translates to "ERROR_NOACCESS: Invalid access to memory location."

Many Windows 10 users experienced error 0x800703e6 when updating Windows 10 version 1903 to version 1909. Also, there have been reports of users unable to install cumulative updates including, KB4023057, KB5003214, KB5003173 on Windows 10 versions 2004 and 20H2.

Most recently, some users encountered error 0x800703e6 when installing the 2021-08 Cumulative Update for Windows 10 Version 21H1 for x64-based Systems (KB5005033) for the current Windows 10 version 21H1.

What Causes Error 0x800703e6?

  1. Error 0x800703e6 may occur when the system can't process any application.
  2. When two applications are using the same memory location.
  3. Corrupted registry keys. A cluttered Windows Registry, faulty and empty entries are usually the result of improperly uninstalled software, which may come into conflict with Windows Update-related services.
  4. Corrupted or missing DLL files or missing or corrupted system or Windows Update files may also trigger this error.
  5. Incorrectly configured system settings and outdated drivers.

Video Instructions on How to Fix Windows Update Error 0x800703e6

Table of Contents:

Solution 1. Run the Windows Update Troubleshooter

 Right-click Start and click Settings

1. Right-click the Windows Start Menu and click Settings.

Select Update & Security

2. In the Settings window, select Update & Security.

Select Troubleshoot

3. In the left pane, select Troubleshoot.

Click Additional troubleshooters

4. Then, click Additional troubleshooters.

Select Windows Update and click Run the troubleshooter

5. Select Windows Update and click Run the troubleshooter.

6. The troubleshooter will select and apply a fix automatically.

7. Try to update Windows.

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Solution 2. Perform Disk Cleanup

1. Hold down Windows+R keys to open Run.

Type in cleanmgr in Run and click OK

2. In the Run dialog box, type in cleanmgr and click OK.

Click Clean up system files

3. Click Clean Up System Files.

Select files to delete and click OK

4. Mark the checkboxes of the locations you want to be cleaned and click OK.

Click Delete files

5. Click Delete Files.

6. Wait for the files to be deleted.

7. Try to update Windows.

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Solution 3. Clear the SoftwareDistribution (Windows Update Cache) Folder

1. Hold down Windows+R keys to open Run.

Type in CMD in Run and hold down Ctrl+Shift+Enter keys to open Command Prompt as administrator

2. In the Run dialog box, type in CMD and hold down Ctrl+Shift+Enter keys to open Command Prompt as an administrator.

type in rd /s /q %systemroot%SoftwareDistribution in the Command prompt and hit Enter to clear the Windows Update cache folder

3. In the Command Prompt window, type in net stop wuauserv and press Enter to stop Windows Update Service.

4. Then, type in rd /s /q %systemroot%\SoftwareDistribution and press Enter to clear the Update cache folder.

5. Then, type in net start wuauserv to restart the Windows Update Service.

6. Close the Command Prompt and try updating Windows.

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Solution 4. Perform a Clean Boot

1. Hold down Windows+R keys to open Run.

Tyepin MSConfig in Run and click OK

2. In the Run dialog box, type in MSConfig and click OK.

Mark the Hide all Microsoft services checkbox and click Disable all

3. In the System Configuration window, select the Services tab.

4. Then, tick the Hide all Microsoft services checkbox.

5. Click Disable all.

Go to the Startup tab and click Open Task Manager

6. Then, Navigate to the Startup tab.

7. Click Open Task Manager.

Right-click each startup application and click Disable

8. Right-click each application, and click Disable.

9. Close the Task Manager.

Click Apply and click OK

10. In the System Configuration window, click Apply and click OK.

Click Restart now when prompted

11. Click Restart when prompted.

12. Try updating Windows.

13. After updating Windows, you can revert back to normal boot. Here is how you can do it.

14. Hold down Windows+R keys to open Run.

Type in MSConfig in Run and click OK

15. In the Run dialog box, type in MSConfig and click OK.

Select Normal startup

16. In the General tab, select Normal startup.

Make sure the Hide all Microsoft services checkbox in unchecked

17. Then, click the Services tab and make sure the Hide all Microsoft services option is unchecked.

Go to the Startup tab and click Open Task Manager

18. Finally, click the Startup tab and click Open Task Manager.

Right-click each startup application and click Enable

19. Enable all previously disabled applications.

20. Close the Task Manager.

Click Apply and click OK

21. In the System Configuration window, click Apply and click OK.

Click Restart when prompted

22. Click Restart when prompted.

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Solution 5. Upgrade Windows 10 Using the Media Creation Tool

Go to the Windows Media Creation Tool download page

1. Go to Microsoft’s Download Windows 10 web page.

Click Download tool now

2. Click Download tool now.

3. Run the Media Creation Tool once it’s been downloaded.

Accept the Media Creation Tool license agreement

4. Then, Accept the license agreement.

Select Upgrade this PC now and click Next

5. Make sure that the Upgrade this PC now is ticked, and click Next.

Accept the Windows 10 license agreement

6. Then, Accept the Windows 10 license agreement.

Click Change what to keep

7. You can choose to keep your personal files and apps, but if you want a clean installation of Windows 10, click the Change what to keep button to customize the installation settings.

Customize your settings and click Next

8. Choose what to keep and click Next.

Click Install

9. Then, click Install, and the setup will begin upgrading Windows 10.

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Solution 6. Run the Deployment Imaging and Servicing Management (DISM) Scan

1. Hold down Windows+R keys to open Run.

Type in CMD in Run and hold down Ctrl+Shift+Enter keys to open Command Prompt as administrator

2. In the Run dialog box, type in CMD and hold down Ctrl+Shift+Enter keys to open Command Prompt as an administrator.

Run DISM ScanHealth and RestoreHealth commands in Command Prompt

3. In the Command Prompt window, type in DISM /Online /Cleanup-Image /ScanHealth and press the Enter key.

4. Then, type in DISM /Online /Cleanup-Image /RestoreHealth and press Enter.

5. Close the Command Prompt and restart your PC.

6. Try to update Windows.

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Solution 7. Run the System File Checker (SFC) Scan

1. Hold down Windows+R keys to open Run.

Type in CMD in Run and hold down Ctrl+Shift+Enter keys to open Command Prompt as administrator

2. In the Run dialog box, type in CMD and hold down Ctrl+Shift+Enter keys to open Command Prompt as an administrator.

Run a SFC scan in Command Prompt

3. In the Command Prompt window, type in SFC /ScanNow and press Enter.

4. Then, close the Command Prompt and restart your PC.

5. Try to update Windows.

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About the author:

Tomas Meskauskas

I am passionate about computer security and technology. I have an experience of 10 years working in various companies related to computer technical issue solving and Internet security. I have been working as an editor for pcrisk.com since 2010. Follow me on Twitter to stay informed about the latest tech news or online security threats. Contact Tomas Meskauskas.

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