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Fix Windows Update Error 0x8009001d

Find out how to fix error code 0x8009001d on Windows 10

When installing Updates on Windows 10, you may get an error code 0x8009001d. Like so many other Windows Update errors, error 0x8009001d occurs due to corrupted system files. Many users started getting this error on Windows 10 with the release of the 2019-11 Cumulative Update for Windows 10 Version 1903 for x64-based Systems (KB4524570). Nevertheless, this error can occur when installing the more recent updates as well. This article is dedicated to helping you fix error code 0x8009001d.

Windows Update is a service that comes built-in with every copy of Windows 10. Its purpose is to automate the downloading and installing of updates over the Internet. Generally, the service delivers updates for the Windows OS but can also deliver updates for other Microsoft products, including Microsoft Office and Microsoft Defender.

Windows Update is set to provide several kinds of updates. Security updates are dedicated to patching security vulnerabilities and, thus, protecting against security exploits. Cumulative updates are update bundles containing many previously released updates as well as new updates.

How to Fix Windows Update Error Code 0x8009001d

Windows 10 runs the Windows Update Agent that was first introduced in Windows Vista. The Windows Update Agent replaced the previously used Windows Update web app and the Automatic Updates client. The Update Agent is responsible for downloading and installing all updates from the Windows Update server.

Unlike in previous Windows versions, the Windows Update service in Windows 10 doesn't allow selective update installation. Therefore, all updates are downloaded and installed automatically. Users can only choose whether the system would reboot automatically to install updates when it's inactive or schedule a reboot.

Windows Update on Windows 10 supports peer-to-peer update distribution. The service is set up to distribute previously downloaded updates to other users and distribute new updates from Microsoft servers.

Microsoft releases feature updates twice a year and cumulative updates once a month or so. Microsoft tries to stay on top of its game in terms of updates that ensure the security and reliability of its operating system. However, sometimes new updates fail to install, resulting in errors such as error 0x8009001d.

Previously, Error 0x8009001d came up when installing the Nov 2019 (19H2) update due to an issue with the update itself. As a result of this error, users are unable to install specific updates. However, it's not always the fault of the update that users get errors. Often, users get errors because some of their system files have become corrupt or due to third-party anti-virus programs interfering with the update process.

To fix errors such as 0x8009001d, it's recommended to run the Windows Update Troubleshooter first. If the troubleshooter fails to fix the problem, it's recommended to run the System File Checker (SFC) scan, Deployment Image Servicing and Management (DISM), and clean the update cache. Lastly, you can manually reset all Windows Update components. We also suggest temporarily disabling your third-party anti-virus software and then updating Windows to see if the anti-virus software is to blame for error 0x8009001d.

Check out the list of possible solutions that can help you fix error 0x8009001d. You can also watch the video found at the bottom of this article to see the full implementation of the proposed fixes.

Table of Contents:

Solution 1. Run Windows Update Troubleshooter

Windows Update Troubleshooter is the default tool for fixing update-related issues on Windows 10. Try running the troubleshooter and see if it can fix error code 0x8009001d.

Right-click Start and click Settings

1. Right-click the Start Menu and click Settings.

Click update & Security

2. Select Update & Security.

Select Troubleshoot

3. Then, select Troubleshoot from the left pane.

Click Additional Troubleshooters

4. Click Additional troubleshooters.

Select Windows Update and click Run the troubleshooter

5. Select Windows Update and then click Run the troubleshooter.

6. The troubleshooter will scan Windows update components for issues and provide fixes.

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Solution 2. Clear the SoftwareDistribution Folder

The SoftwareDistribution folder stores temporary Windows Update files. But, with each new update release, you may run into problems since the cache folder stores backups of previous Windows versions.

1. Simultaneously hold down Windows+R keys to open Run.

Type in CMD and hold down Ctrl+Shift+Enter keys to open the elevated Command Prompt

2. Type in CMD in the dialog box and hold down Ctrl+Shift+Enter keys to open the elevated Command Prompt.

Clean the SoftwareDistribution folder

3. In the Command Prompt window, type in net stop wuauserv and press Enter to stop Windows Update Service.

4. Then, type in rd /s /q %systemroot%\SoftwareDistribution and press Enter to clear the Update cache folder.

5. Then, type in net start wuauserv to restart the previously stopped Windows Update Service.

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Solution 3. Run the System File Checker (SFC) Scan

1. Simultaneously hold Windows+R keys to open Run.

Type in CMD and hold down Ctrl+Shift+Enter keys to open the elevated Command Prompt

2. In the Run dialog box, type in CMD and hold down Ctrl+Shift+Enter keys to open the elevated Command Prompt.

Type in SFC /Scannow and press the Enter key

3. In the Command Prompt window, type in SFC /Scannow and press the Enter key.

4. Reboot your PC and try updating Windows.

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Solution 4. Run the Deployment Image & Servicing Management (DISM) Scan

A corrupt Windows image may cause error 0x8009001d. If that's indeed the case, you can try running DISM, which will clean up and repairing the corrupt Windows image.

1. Simultaneously hold down Windows+R keys to open Run.

Type in CMD and hold down Ctrl+Shift+Enter keys to open the elevated Command Prompt

2. Type in CMD in the dialog box and hold down Ctrl+Shift+Enter keys to open the elevated Command Prompt.

Run DISM ScanHealth and RestoreHealth commands

3. Type in DISM /Online /Cleanup-Image /ScanHealth in the Command Prompt window, and press the Enter key.

4. Then, type in DISM /Online /Cleanup-Image /RestoreHealth and press the Enter key.

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Solution 5. Manually Reset Windows Update Service Components

1. Simultaneously hold down Windows+R keys to open Run.

Type in CMD and hold down Ctrl+Shift+Enter keys to open the elevated Command Prompt

2. Type in CMD in the dialog box and hold down Ctrl+Shift+Enter keys to open the elevated Command Prompt.

Stop Windows Update-related services

3. Type in the commands listed below, and press the Enter key after entering each one:

  • net stop wuauserv
  • net stop cryptSvc
  • net stop bits
  • net stop msiserver

Then, rename the SoftwareDistribution and Catroot2 folders.

Restart Windows Update-related services

4. Type in ren C:\Windows\SoftwareDistribution SoftwareDistribution.old and press Enter.

5. Then, type in ren C:\Windows\System32\Catroot2 Catroot2.old and press Enter.

6. Type in the commands listed below, and press the Enter key after entering each one to restart the previously stopped services:

  • net start wuauserv
  • net start cryptSvc
  • net start bits
  • net start msiserver

7. Try updating windows once you've reset the Windows Update components.

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Video Guide on How to Fix Windows Update Error 0x8009001d

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About the author:

Tomas Meskauskas

I am passionate about computer security and technology. I have an experience of 10 years working in various companies related to computer technical issue solving and Internet security. I have been working as an editor for pcrisk.com since 2010. Follow me on Twitter to stay informed about the latest tech news or online security threats. Contact Tomas Meskauskas.

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