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How to Use a Third-Party Mouse With Trackpad Gestures on Mac?

How to Use Trackpad Gestures With a Third-Party Mouse on Mac?

Apple's Magic Mouse, like all Apple products, is very different from other available mouses. What makes it unique is the top surface. You can do all sorts of gestures to interact with your Mac. But, if you're new to Mac or have been using a traditional mouse your whole life transitioning to Magic Mouse can be a little bit hard. Don't worry; if you don't like the Magic Mouse, you can use your standard one with your Mac as well.

How to Use a Third-Party Mouse With Trackpad Gestures on Mac?

What You Need to Do Before Using the Third-Party Mouse?

When the third-party mouse is connected to your Mac, you need to adjust basic mouse settings accordingly, as the same settings won't necessarily fit the Windows mouse. What you need to do is to tweak the tracking, scrolling, and double-click speeds.

The tracking speed determines how fast your mouse is on your Mac screen, and the scrolling speed determines how many pages you will scroll through with the spin on the wheel button. As the name suggests, the double-click speed determines how fast your Mac will recognize the double-click gesture.

Can You Use Trackpad Gestures With the Standart Mouse?

Although the standard mouse is more comfortable for you, the downside of using a standard Windows mouse with your Mac is you lose the trackpad gestures like swiping left or right. But, fortunately, there's a way you can use your Windows mouse and still have those gestures available. And you can even choose how you want to perform these gestures.

To use Magic Mouse gestures with your standard one, you need to create them. You can easily do that with the help of the xGestures program and a few AppleScripts. You'll find all links and step-by-step explanations and how to do each step in the methods below.

Video on How to Use Trackpad Gestures With a Third-Party Mouse on Mac?

Table of Contents:

How to Connect a Third-Party Mouse on Your Mac

Almost all mouses will work both on Windows and macOS. Even those that say they're compatible with Windows. All it needs to do is to connect with Bluetooth or USB port.

To connect a Bluetooth mouse to Mac, follow the steps below:

1. Turn on the Bluetooth on the mouse.
2. On your Mac, from the menu bar, tap on the Apple logo.
3. Select "System Preferences".
4. Then, click on "Bluetooth". If Bluetooth is disabled, turn it on.

Go to Bluetooth

5. Wait for your Mac to find the mouse. When it does, click on it to connect the mouse to your Mac.

If Mac can't find your mouse, enable the pairing mode on it.

To connect a USB mouse to Mac, follow the steps below:

1. Insert the USB cable into the USB port on your Mac.
2. Wait while the mouse is detected automatically. The necessary drivers will be installed automatically in the background.

If your Mac doesn't detect the mouse, remove the cable or the stick and insert it in a different USB port.

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How to Modify Basic Mouse Settings on Your Mac

When the new mouse gets connected, the first thing you need to do is to go through the settings and tweak them accordingly. We recommend turning off natural scrolling, changing tracking, scrolling, and double-click speed settings.

To disable natural scrolling, follow the steps below:

1. From the menu bar, click on the Apple logo.
2. Go to "System Preferences".
3. Then, go to "Mouse" settings.

Go to Mouse settings

4. Uncheck the box next to "Scroll direction: Natural".

Disable Natural Scrolling

To change the tracking speed, follow the steps below:

1. From the menu bar, click on the Apple logo.
2. Go to "System Preferences".
3. Then, go to "Mouse" settings.

Go to Mouse settings

4. Under "Tracking speed", move the slider to find the most comfortable mouse moving speed.

Change tracking speed

To change the scrolling speed, follow the steps below:

1. From the menu bar, click on the Apple logo.
2. Go to "System Preferences".
3. Then, go to "Mouse" settings.

Go to Mouse settings

4. Under "Scrolling speed", move the slider to find the most comfortable mouse scrolling speed.

Change scrolling speed

To change the double-click speed, follow the steps below:

1. From the menu bar, click on the Apple logo.
2. Go to "System Preferences".
3. Then, go to "Mouse" settings.

Go to Mouse settings

4. Under "Double-click speed", move the slider to find the most comfortable mouse double-click speed.

Change double-click speed

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How to Enable Spring-Loading Delay on Your Mac

The spring-loading delay is the feature that opens a folder when you hold a file over it. When you connect a third-party mouse, this feature turns off. Fortunately, you can enable it and use it with your connected mouse.

To turn on the spring-loading delay, follow the steps below:

1. From the menu bar, click on the Apple logo.
2. Go to "System Preferences".
3. Click on "Accessibility".

Go to Accessibility settings

4. Under the "Motor" section, select "Point Control".

select Point Control

5. Then, in the "Mouse & Trackpad" tab, check the box next to "Spring-loading-delay".

Enable Spring-loading delay

The shorter the spring-loading is, the faster the folder will open. With long spring-loading is the opposite.

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How to Use Trackpad Gestures With the Third-Party Mouse on Your Mac

When using a third-party mouse on Mac, you can't use the trackpad gestures that you would with the Magic mouse. But, what if we told you there was a way? With the help of xGestures, you'll be able to use the same gestures you would with the original Apple mouse. It's a free app that anyone can use.

To use trackpad gesture with a third-party mouse, follow the steps below:

1. Download xGestures to your Mac.
2. Then, download these Apple scripts. These scripts will allow you to use the three-finger windows switch and the three-finger swipe up to see the Mission Control gestures with the third-party mouse.
3. Save the Apple scrips in a separate folder and keep them.

Save script files

4. From the menu bar, click on the Apple logo.
5. Go to "System Preferences".
6. Click on "xGestures".

Go to xGestures

7. In the "Gesturing" tab, select how you want to perform the gestures with the mouse. Either with the middle button or by using the right and left buttons. You can explore other options as well.

Choose gesturus using mouse buttons

8. Now, go to the "Applications" tab.
9. Check the box next to "Enable Global Gestures".

Enable Global Gestures

10 Then, select "New Gesture".

Create new gesture

11. When a window pops up, click on the left side arrow. You should see the word 'Left' written. When done, click on "OK".

Svae created gesture

12. As "Gesture action", select "Run AppleScript".

Select Run AppleScript

13. Import the "ctrl-right" script for the Left gesture. Do the same thing for the Right and Up gestures. Import the "ctrl-left" script for the Right and the "ctrl-up" for the Up gestures.

Import ctrl-right script

14. Next, go to the "Options" tab and check the box next to "Start xGestures when logging in".

Start xGestures when logging in

15. Finally, click on "Apply Settings".

Click on Apply Settings

If the created gestures stop working, go to "xGestures" preferences, and in the "Options" tab, click on "Start xGestures" to re-enable the feature.

We hope with the help of our article you managed to get the gestures working with your third-party mouse.

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About the author:

Tomas Meskauskas

I am passionate about computer security and technology. I have an experience of 10 years working in various companies related to computer technical issue solving and Internet security. I have been working as an editor for pcrisk.com since 2010. Follow me on Twitter to stay informed about the latest tech news or online security threats. Contact Tomas Meskauskas.

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